APPLY

Ni Hao China is Authorized to represent Chinese top universities to recruit international students and process online applications.

Before your application, we suggest you to contact our experienced consultants first, they are always there to assist and help you, offering insights on how to best prepare your application, minimizing the risk of wasting time and money from failed application attempt.

Sign In

Forgot password?

STUDY IN Hainan

Why Hainan



Hainan is the smallest and southernmost province of the People's Republic of China (PRC), consisting of various islands in the South China Sea. Hainan Island, separated from Guangdong's Leizhou Peninsula by the Qiongzhou Strait, is the largest and fifth most populous island under PRC control (Taiwan, which is slightly larger, is also claimed but not controlled by the PRC) and makes up the majority of the province.
 

History

Hainan Island first enters written Chinese history in 110 BC, when the Han Dynasty established a military garrison there following the arrival of General Lu Bode (路博德). In 46 BC the Han court decided that the conquest was too expensive and abandoned the island. Around that time, Han people together with military personnel and officials began to migrate to Hainan Island from mainland China. Among them were the offspring of those who were banished to Hainan for political reasons. Most of them arrived in Hainan Island from the southern provinces of Guangdong, Fujian and Guangxi.
 
During the Three Kingdoms Period, Hainan was the Zhuya Commandery (珠崖郡) under the control of Eastern Wu.
 
At the time of the Song Dynasty (980-1279), Hainan became part of Guangxi Province, and for the first time large numbers of Han Chinese arrived, settling mostly in the north. Under the Yuan Dynasty (1206–1368) the island became an independent province then in 1370 was placed under the administration of Guangdong Province by the ruling Ming Dynasty. In the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, large numbers of Han Chinese from Fujian and Guangdong began migrating to Hainan, pushing the Li into the highlands in the southern half of the island. In the eighteenth century, the Li rebelled against the government, which responded by bringing in mercenaries from the Miao people regions of Guizhou Province. Many of the Miao settled on the island and their descendants live in the western highlands to this day.
 
In 1906, the Chinese Republican leader Sun Yat-sen proposed that Hainan should become a separate province although this did not happen until 1988.
 
Hainan was historically part of Guangdong and Guangxi Provinces and as such was the Ch'iung-yai or Qiongya Circuit (琼崖道) under the 1912 establishment of the Republic of China. In 1921, it was planned to become a Special Administrative Region 琼崖特別行政区); in 1944, it became Hainan Special Administrative Region with 16 counties containing the South China Sea Islands.
 
During the 1920s and 30s, Hainan was a hotbed of Communist activity, especially after a bloody crackdown in Shanghai, the Republic of China in 1927 drove many Communists into hiding. The Communists and the Li natives fought a vigorous guerrilla campaign against the Japanese occupation of Hainan (1939–45), but in retaliation over one third of the male population were killed by the Japanese. Feng Baiju led the Hainan Independent Column of fighters throughout the 1930s and 1940s. After the Japanese surrender in 1945 the Nationalist Party (KMT) re-established control. Hainan was one of the last areas of China controlled by the Republic of China. From March to May 1950, the Landing Operation on Hainan Island captured the island for the Chinese communists. Feng Baiju and his column of guerrilla fighters played an essential role in scouting for the landing operation and coordinated their own offensive from their jungle bases on the island. This allowed the Hainan takeover to be successful. The takeover was made possible by the presence of a local guerrilla force.
On 1 May 1950, under the PRC, the Special Administrative Region became an Administrative Region Office (海南行政区公署), a branch of the Guangdong provincial government. On October 1, 1984, it became the Hainan Administrative Region (海南行政区), with a People's Government, and finally as province separate from Guangdong four years later.
In 1988, when the island was made a separate province, it was designated a Special Economic Zone in an effort to increase investment.
 

Geography

Hainan, separated by the Qiongzhou Strait from the Leizhou Peninsula of Guangdong, is the largest island administered by the People's Republic of China. The area of Hainan Island (32,900 km2 (12,700 sq mi), 97% of the province) is similar to that of Belgium. To the west of Hainan Island is the Gulf of Tonkin. Wuzhi Mountain is the highest mountain on the island at 1,840 m (6,040 ft). Hainan Island measures 155 km (96 mi) long and 169 km (105 mi) wide. The northern half of Hainan is covered with the ancient Hainan Volcanic Field. Beneath the topsoil is volcanic rock while the topsoil itself contains small pieces of this vesicular rock. Wetland covers 320,000 hectares, 78,000 hectares of which were created artificially. Most of this is located in the eastern and northern part of Hainan.
 

Climate

Hainan has a tropical monsoon climate. Its average annual temperature is 22-26°C (71-79°F) and the temperature is coldest in January and February when it averages around 16-21°C (61-70°F). Because of the 1750-2650 hours of sunshine it receives every year, Hainan can reap three harvests of rice and is an ideal place for growing out-of-season vegetables and breeding fine-strain seeds.
 
The annual precipitation in Hainan is 1,639 mm on average and the rainy season runs from May to October, contributing to 70-90% of the total rainfall. The three largest rivers, namely, the Nandu, Changhua and Wanquan Rivers, have a total water surface over 3,000 square kilometers and their valleys cover more than 10,000 square kilometers. The water surface of Hainan's reservoirs covers an area of 56,000 hectares. Reservoirs such as Songtao, Daguangba, Niululing, Wanning, Changmao and Shilu are among the largest.
 

Population and Nationalities

The population density of Hainan is low compared to most Chinese coastal provinces. In 2000, the ethnic groups of Hainan included the Han Chinese, who are the majority (84% of the population); the Li (Hlai) (14.7% of the population); the Miao (0.7%) and the Zhuang (0.6%).[citation needed] The Li are the largest indigenous group on the island in terms of population. Also found on the island are the Utsuls, descendants of Cham refugees, who are classified as Hui by the Chinese government. There is a Tanka community that live at Sanya Bay. Although they are indigenous to the island and do not speak a Chinese language, the Limgao (Ong-Be) people near the capital (8% of the Hainan population) are counted as Han Chinese by the Chinese government.
 

Economy

Hainan's economy is predominantly agricultural, and more than a half of the island's exports are agricultural products. Hainan's elevation to province-level status (1988), however, was accompanied by its designation as China's largest "special economic zone", the intent being to hasten the development of the island's plentiful resources. Prior to this, the province had a reputation for being a "Wild West" area, largely untouched by industrialisation; even today there are relatively few factories in the province. Tourism plays an important part of Hainan's economy, thanks largely to its tropical beaches and lush forests. The central government has encouraged foreign investment in Hainan and has allowed the island to rely to a large extent on market forces. 

Internship & Job Opportunities


HNA Group

Nestlé

China Mobile

China Development Bank

GF Securities

APPLY

Ni Hao China is Authorized to represent Chinese top universities to recruit international students and process online applications.

Before your application, we suggest you to contact our experienced consultants first, they are always there to assist and help you, offering insights on how to best prepare your application, minimizing the risk of wasting time and money from failed application attempt.

Contact Us
Message

Contact Us