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STUDY IN Gansu

Why Gansu


It lies between the Tibetan and Loess plateaus, and borders Mongolia, Inner Mongolia, and Ningxia to the north, Xinjiang and Qinghai to the west, Sichuan to the south, and Shaanxi to the east. The Yellow River passes through the southern part of the province.
 

History

Gansu is one of the birthplaces of the Chinese nation and ancient Chinese civilization. Dating back to the Xia Dynasty, Gansu was under administration of Yongzhou. During the periods of the Shang and Zhou Dynasties, the countries of Gong, Mi, Rui, Zheng and Yu were founded here.
 
The Qin state, later to become the founding state of the Chinese empire, formed from the southeastern part of Gansu, specifically the Tianshui area. The Qin name itself is believed to have originated, in part, from the area. The ancestors of Zhou (11-256 B.C.) and Qin (221-206 B.C.), both took the eastern part of Gansu as their base, grew from strength to strength and fulfilled the great cause of unifying China. During the period of the Han Dynasty, Emperor Wu set up four Juns, Wuwei, Zhanfye, Jiuquan and Dunhuang in Hexi, after that a succession of other Juns were established such as Tianshui Jun, Anding Jun, Wudu Jun and Jinzheng Jun. Under the jurisdiction of these governments, there were 115 counties.
 
In the periods of the Sui and Tang dynasties, the prefecture-county system changed significantly. The administrative areas were divided according to state, prefecture and county. In the period of the Three Kingdoms the majority of the Gansu Province belonged to Wei. Up to the Tang Dynasty, it was under the administration of Guanlei and Longyou Dao. As for the Song Dynasty, there were 17 states under the jurisdiction of Yongxing, Qinfeng and Lizhou Lu.
 
During the Xixia Dynasty the western part the area belonged to Gansu while the eastern part was occupied by Jin. In the Yuan Dynasty, the system of provinces was adopted and China was divided into 11 provinces. In 1218, Gansu Zhongshu Province was officially formed with Zhangye as the capital. Most parts of present day Gansu as well as some parts of present day Qinghai, Ningxia, Xinjiang and Inner Mongolia were under the jurisdiction of Zhongshu Province. It governed 7Lu, 5 states directly under the central government, and 4 Fu, 24 counties. This was the beginning of the administrative division of the Gansu province.
 
In the Ming Dynasty, the province system was abolished and 13 Chengxuan Buzhengshishi were set up and most of present day Gansu was governed by Shanxi Buzhengshishi. In the early Qin Dynasty, Gansu was separated from Shanxi, and it governed the areas of Xining Fu, Ningxia Fu and the eastern part of present day Xingjiang. Dating back to the period of Emperor Guangxu, Xingjiang was separated from Gansu.  In the Republic of China, the administrative division system of province, Dao and county was put into practice, the territory of Gansu was almost the same as the Qing Dynasty’s and governed 7 Dao and 76 counties. In 1927, the Dao system was abolished. In 1928, Qinghai and Ningxia set up provinces respectively, the territory of Gansu became much less and Gansu was divided into one city (Lanzhou), 69 counties and 2 bureaus.
 

Geography and Climate

Gansu has an area of 454,000 square kilometres (175,000 sq mi), and the vast majority of its land is more than 1,000 metres (3,300 ft) above sea level. It lies between the Tibetan Plateau and the Loess Plateau, bordering Mongolia (Govi-Altai Province) to the northwest, Inner Mongolia and Ningxia to the north, Shaanxi to the east, Sichuan to the south, and Xinjiang to the west. The Yellow River passes through the southern part of the province. The province contains the geographical centre of China, marked by the Center of the Country Monument at 35°50′40.9″N 103°27′7.5″E.[21]
 
Part of the Gobi Desert is located in Gansu, as well as small parts of the Badain Jaran Desert and the Tengger Desert.
 
The Yellow River gets most of its water from Gansu, flowing straight through Lanzhou. The area around Wuwei is part of Shiyang River Basin.[22]
 
The landscape in Gansu is very mountainous in the south and flat in the north. The mountains in the south are part of the Qilian Mountains, while the far western Altyn-Tagh contains the province’s highest point, at 5,830 metres (19,130 ft).
 
A natural land passage known as Hexi Corridor, stretching some 1,000 kilometres (620 mi) from Lanzhou to the Jade Gate, is situated within the province. It is bound from north by the Gobi Desert and Qilian Mountains from the south.
 
Gansu generally has a semi-arid to arid continental climate (Köppen BSk or BWk) with warm to hot summers and cold to very cold winters, although diurnal temperature ranges are often so large that maxima remain above 0 °C (32 °F) even in winter. However, due to extreme altitude, some areas of Gansu exhibit a subarctic climate (Dwc) – with winter temperatures sometimes dropping to −40 °C (−40 °F). Most of the limited precipitation is delivered in the summer months: winters are so dry that snow cover is confined to very high altitudes and the snow line can be as high as 5,500 metres (18,040 ft) in the southwest.
 

Population and Nationalities

Gansu province is home to 30,711,287 people. Most of the population, 73%, is rural. Gansu is 92% Han and also has Hui, Tibetan, Dongxiang, Tu, Yugur, Bonan, Mongolian, Salar, and Kazakh minorities. Gansu province's community of Chinese Hui Muslims was bolstered by Hui Muslims resettled from Shaanxi province during the Dungan Revolt. Gansu is also a historical home, along with Shaanxi, of the dialect of the Dungans, who migrated to Central Asia. The southwestern corner of Gansu is home to a large ethnic Tibetan population.
 

Economy

Agricultural production includes cotton, linseed oil, maize, melons (such as the honeydew melon, known locally as the Bailan melon or "Wallace" due to its introduction by US vice president Henry A. Wallace),[28] millet, and wheat. Gansu is known as a source for wild medicinal herbs which are used in Chinese medicine. However, pollution by heavy metals, such as cadmium in irrigation water, has resulted in the poisoning of many acres of agricultural land. The extent and nature of the heavy metal pollution is considered a state secret.[29]
However, most of Gansu's economy is based on mining and the extraction of minerals, especially rare earth elements. The province has significant deposits of antimony, chromium, coal, cobalt, copper, fluorite, gypsum, iridium, iron, lead, limestone, mercury, mirabilite, nickel, crude oil, platinum, troilite, tungsten, and zinc among others. The oil fields at Yumen and Changqing are considered significant.



Internship & Job Opportunities


Haitong International Securities Group

Peace Corps

Veolia

China Merchants Bank

WABCO

New Oriental

China CITIC Bank
 

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Ni Hao China is Authorized to represent Chinese top universities to recruit international students and process online applications.

Before your application, we suggest you to contact our experienced consultants first, they are always there to assist and help you, offering insights on how to best prepare your application, minimizing the risk of wasting time and money from failed application attempt.

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